On the Table For Winter

You may remember that last year we started a seasonal series on the Mokhado blog with the autumn edition of On the Table. We’re back this month to give you a taste of the flavours you can bet we’ll be enjoying all season long.

 

Parsnips

Parsnips have been enjoyed at the dinner table in their roasted form for years and years, and we can’t wait to have plenty of helpings of this roasted sweet root veg all winter long. However, this year we’re slowly discovering the other ways you can serve this surprisingly versatile veg. Did you know, for example, that when peeled and cubed, then fried in macadamia nut oil until golden brown, they make the most delicious crispy fries? Alternatively, cut into chunks and boil until tender then mash with a little butter for a wonderful alternative to mash - it makes a great topping for shepherd’s pie! 

 

Mustard

image: Jessica Spengler 

A very British way to add a delicious kick to your meals and warm yourself up. Whether it’s mustard powder, dijon mustard or our beloved wholegrain, we’ll be spicing up our soups, sandwiches and just about everything else we can get our hands on with this stuff all winter. It’s easier than you think to make it yourself, and we just might have to try this recipe for homemade beer mustard

 

Grapefruit

image: liz west

image: liz west

The grapefruit is making a small comeback now that it’s slowly getting over it’s reputation as the miserable breakfast food of the 1980s dieter. Sliced thinly, it makes a visually pleasing addition to hearty winter salads, or for a fancy brunch, sprinkle with brown sugar and grill until a delicious golden crust is formed. It’s in season in the UK throughout the winter, and you can find it in the same section as oranges at the supermarket.

 

Roast Dinners

Imagine a winter without a roast dinner, it would be like December without Christmas. Simply unbearable. We love the classic chicken with rosemary roast potatoes, the roast beef with yorkshire puddings, even the occasional veggie butternut squash filo pie. If it’s a Sunday, you can bet we’ll be digging in to a plate covered in gravy. Give your greens on the side something special by frying them in a splash of avocado oil..

Which foods will you be tucking into the most this season? We’d love to hear about them, why not get in touch and tell us on Twitter or Facebook?

10 Delicious Bakes That Use Oil Instead of Butter

The Great British Bake Off had us all racing to the shops to stock up on plenty of eggs, sugar and flour again this year. Over the summer, the whole country was bonkers for baking, with many of us spending the weekend whisking, beating and kneading to our heart’s content.

We’ve still got the baking bug, so we’ve done some research to find 10 glorious bakes that we can use our extra virgin cold pressed oils in - we can’t wait to get into the kitchen and give them a go!

Banana and Blueberry Granola Bars

These banana and blueberry granola bars from Sus over at Rough Measures are the perfect snack to take to the office or pop in the kids lunchboxes. It’s packed full of healthy ingredients to keep you feeling satisfied until your next meal, and the combination of blueberry and banana sounds lovely. Sus uses coconut oil in this recipe, but we think our macadamia nut oil would be a great substitute.

These banana and blueberry granola bars from Sus over at Rough Measures are the perfect snack to take to the office or pop in the kids lunchboxes. It’s packed full of healthy ingredients to keep you feeling satisfied until your next meal, and the combination of blueberry and banana sounds lovely. Sus uses coconut oil in this recipe, but we think our macadamia nut oil would be a great substitute.

Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Muffins

Aren’t these pumpkin chocolate chip muffins beautiful? The Petite Cook sure knows how to put autumn into a muffin. Pumpkin puree, pumpkin spices and cinnamon come together to create a warming and seasonal treat. Andrea uses olive oil in this recipe, but our apricot kernel oil would certainly complement the flavours in these muffins too.

Aren’t these pumpkin chocolate chip muffins beautiful? The Petite Cook sure knows how to put autumn into a muffin. Pumpkin puree, pumpkin spices and cinnamon come together to create a warming and seasonal treat. Andrea uses olive oil in this recipe, but our apricot kernel oil would certainly complement the flavours in these muffins too.

Pumpkin Zucchini Bread

This pumpkin zucchini bread is low in sugar and has a high veg content, a great treat for the healthier eaters among us! If you grow your own veg and find yourself with a big courgette glut at this time of year, this is a perfect way to use some of it up. Amber and Alex use coconut oil in this recipe, but it would be just as tasty with some of our avocado oil.  

This pumpkin zucchini bread is low in sugar and has a high veg content, a great treat for the healthier eaters among us! If you grow your own veg and find yourself with a big courgette glut at this time of year, this is a perfect way to use some of it up. Amber and Alex use coconut oil in this recipe, but it would be just as tasty with some of our avocado oil.  

Dark Chocolate Chunk Molasses Blondies

The things we would do for a batch of dark chocolate chunk molasses blondies right now.. There’s nothing quite like something warm and chocolatey straight from the oven on a chilly, rainy weekend, is there? Jessie uses coconut oil in this recipe, but our nutty macadamia nut oil would be a great substitute.  

The things we would do for a batch of dark chocolate chunk molasses blondies right now.. There’s nothing quite like something warm and chocolatey straight from the oven on a chilly, rainy weekend, is there? Jessie uses coconut oil in this recipe, but our nutty macadamia nut oil would be a great substitute.  

Pumpkin Spice Waffles

Some people get irritated with the pumpkin spice trend, but how could you when it results in things like pumpkin spice waffles? We’d just love to whip up a batch of these and drown them in good quality maple syrup. Jessie uses coconut oil in this recipe, but the subtle fruity notes in our apricot kernel oil would work nicely too.

Some people get irritated with the pumpkin spice trend, but how could you when it results in things like pumpkin spice waffles? We’d just love to whip up a batch of these and drown them in good quality maple syrup. Jessie uses coconut oil in this recipe, but the subtle fruity notes in our apricot kernel oil would work nicely too.

Vegan Pumpkin Cheesecake

The rise in veganism has cause a rise in some seriously impressive creativity in the kitchen. This vegan pumpkin cheesecake looks as creamy as can be, all thanks to the magic of plant-based ingredients like coconut milk and cashews. Dana uses olive oil in this recipe, but our macadamia nut oil would work really well with the pumpkin flavour too!

The rise in veganism has cause a rise in some seriously impressive creativity in the kitchen. This vegan pumpkin cheesecake looks as creamy as can be, all thanks to the magic of plant-based ingredients like coconut milk and cashews. Dana uses olive oil in this recipe, but our macadamia nut oil would work really well with the pumpkin flavour too!

Pumpkin Spice Cinnamon Buns

These pumpkin spice cinnamon buns sound like the ultimate comfort food. They’re particularly special because you can make the dough the night before and enjoy them as a totally hassle free but ridiculously delicious breakfast in the morning! Alexandra uses coconut oil in this recipe but our macadamia nut oil would be just as tasty.

These pumpkin spice cinnamon buns sound like the ultimate comfort food. They’re particularly special because you can make the dough the night before and enjoy them as a totally hassle free but ridiculously delicious breakfast in the morning! Alexandra uses coconut oil in this recipe but our macadamia nut oil would be just as tasty.

Pumpkin Sticky Toffee Pudding

This pumpkin sticky toffee pudding takes the pub grub classic to new levels of mouthwatering. Better yet, it’s packed full of healthy and natural ingredients like date paste, almond milk and pumpkin puree. Rachel uses coconut oil for this sticky toffee pudding, but apricot kernel oil would certainly do the trick as well.

This pumpkin sticky toffee pudding takes the pub grub classic to new levels of mouthwatering. Better yet, it’s packed full of healthy and natural ingredients like date paste, almond milk and pumpkin puree. Rachel uses coconut oil for this sticky toffee pudding, but apricot kernel oil would certainly do the trick as well.

Cinnamon Chai Banana Bread

This cinnamon chai banana bread just screams autumn, we love the warm flavours of chai - and you can’t go wrong with a good banana bread! A warm slice with a chai latte would be the perfect way to start your weekend. Sarah uses coconut oil for this bake, but the subtle, smooth grassy flavour of avocado oil just might be a perfect fit too.

This cinnamon chai banana bread just screams autumn, we love the warm flavours of chai - and you can’t go wrong with a good banana bread! A warm slice with a chai latte would be the perfect way to start your weekend. Sarah uses coconut oil for this bake, but the subtle, smooth grassy flavour of avocado oil just might be a perfect fit too.

Witch Finger Cookies

The recipe for these witch finger cookies is officially the only recipe you need this Halloween. They’re perfectly spooky and look tasty as anything to boot! We love the idea of using flaked almonds to create the look of witchy, gnarly fingernails. Taylor uses coconut oil in this recipe, but macadamia nut oil would work nicely too.   We hope you enjoyed these butter-less recipes. If you decide to bake any, make sure you let us know on Facebook or Twitter!

The recipe for these witch finger cookies is officially the only recipe you need this Halloween. They’re perfectly spooky and look tasty as anything to boot! We love the idea of using flaked almonds to create the look of witchy, gnarly fingernails. Taylor uses coconut oil in this recipe, but macadamia nut oil would work nicely too.

 

We hope you enjoyed these butter-less recipes. If you decide to bake any, make sure you let us know on Facebook or Twitter!





On the Table for Autumn

We love our oil, but you won’t be surprised to hear that it’s not all we eat. The Mokhado team are big on food, which is why we’re introducing On the Table, our new seasonal blog series.

Every few months, we’ll be focusing on a few meals, flavours and trends that we can’t get enough of. Hopefully we’ll encourage you to try something new and get excited about the changing of the seasons - even if it does mean it’s about to get a whole lot darker..

Pumpkin Spice

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image credit: LilyandVal

Could we really have started this list with anything else? Whether you love or hate the PSL (that’s Pumpkin Spice Latte if you’ve been living under a rock since 2003), you just can’t avoid the pumpkin spice mania that takes hold as soon as autumn comes knocking.

If you really do hate the latte, there are about a gazillion other ways to give the flavour a try - and we recommend you do, you’ve got to try everything once, right? It’s essentially just a combination of cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, allspice and cloves. Check out this link if you want to make your own.

Soup

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image credit: Foodie Awareness

We’re transitioning from light, cool, summer meals to something a little warmer and more substantial. Once we get to winter time, I’m sure we’ll all be carb-loading like there’s no tomorrow, but soup is a lovely half-way point until we get there.

You can go sweet and creamy with something like sweet potato soup, or comforting and super-seasonal with a courgette and potato soup. Hell, why not try chocolate soup? We’re not here to judge.

Preserves

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image credit: Not Enough Cinnamon

If you’re lucky enough to have a bountiful garden, an allotment to call your own or a friend with a few fruit trees, you’ll know that September is a big month for produce. So big, in fact, that it’s quite impossible to eat everything you harvest before it goes past its best.

The (very delicious) solution to this is preserves. Jam can be a little intimidating if you’re just starting out, but chutney is a particularly excellent place to begin. Simply cook up produce with some onions and vinegar and a little sugar and you’re pretty much there.

If you don’t fancy making your own but want to jump on the chutney train, there are some great artisan brands out there these days that are of a really high calibre. A good cheese is nothing without a great chutney, thank us next time you make cheese on toast..

Crumble toppings

Until recently, we all thought that crumble was just for topping sweet, stewed fruit like rhubarb or apples. Oh, how wrong we were.

Crumble and custard for dessert is nothing short of a British tradition, a staple in most households. Savoury crumble, however, is what’s going to be happening a lot in our kitchen this year. Crumble toppings on soups, roasted veggies, mince, it’s all to play for. 

Never made a crumble before? It couldn’t be easier. Just rub together some flour, butter and sugar and you’re away. If you’re feeling experimental, try adding nuts, seeds, spices and oats to make it all the more warming and substantial. Here’s a basic recipe for apple crumble to get you started.

Salted caramel

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image credit: Drizzle and Dip

This is a trend that has, admittedly, been taken too far over the years. Did we really need salted caramel green tea? Probably not. However, salted caramel is still delicious, regardless of how overplayed it’s been.

Ever dipped apple slices in salted caramel? No? You haven’t lived. It’s perfect drizzled on ice cream too, and when paired with chocolate becomes dangerously addictive. We’re going to be consuming plenty of salted caramel this season, in moderation of course..

Those are our autumn must-eats, now we want to hear yours. Let us know your favourite thing to eat during autumn on Twitter to be in with a chance of winning one of our Great Taste Award winning oils!